Native Nations: The Survival of Indigenous Peoples (3rd ed)

Edited By: Sharlotte Neely & Douglas W. Hume

40.00USD

Within Native Nations: The Survival of Indigenous Peoples (3rd ed), Dr. Sharlotte Neely (Professor Emerita of Anthropology at Northern Kentucky University) and Dr. Douglas W. Hume (Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy Department at Northern Kentucky University) have put together an impressive examination pertaining to the survival strategies employed by Indigenous peoples, the world over, in order to discern how Native peoples have maintained their traditional culture, language, sacred lands, and identity.

  • ISBN: 978-1-926476-29-2 (Paperback)
    Price: $40.00
    Binding: Paperback
    Date: 2020
    Rights: World
    Pages: 323
    Size: 6″ x 9″

    ISBN: 978-1-926476-31-5 (EPUB)

  • Table of Contents

    Tables

    Dedication
    Map of the Fourth World
    Table of Contents

    PART I: Introduction
    1. What It Means to Be Indigenous
    Sharlotte Neely

    PART II: Case Studies
    2. The Ainu of Japan
    Jeffry Gayman

    3. Native Australians
    Robert Tonkinson

    4. The Basques of the Pyrenees: The Native Europeans
    Xabier Irujo

    5. Bretons/Brittany Celts (France)
    Michael J. Simonton

    6. Māori of New Zealand
    Margaret Mutu

    7. Suspended Sovereignty: Native Hawaiian/Kānaka Maoli Nationalities, Subjectivities, Historiographies
    ‘Umi Perkins

    8. Native North Americans
    Mark Q. Sutton

    9. Potohari Punjabi of Pakistan
    Stephen M. Lyon

    10. The San of Southern Africa
    Robert Hitchcock, & Maria Sapignoli

    11. The Sami
    Dikka Storm

    12. Taiwanese Indigenous People
    Yuan-Chao Tung

    13. Yanomami of Venezuela
    Douglas W. Hume

    PART III: Conclusion
    14. Teaching Cultural Survival
    Douglas W. Hume

    Index
    About the Authors

  • Sharlotte Neely & Douglas W. Hume

    Sharlotte Neely, PhD is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at Northern Kentucky University. She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is the author of the book, Snowbird Cherokees as well as numerous other publications.

    Douglas W. Hume, PhD is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy Department at Northern Kentucky University. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Connecticut and is the author of “Darkness in Academia: Cultural Models of How Anthropologists and Journalists Write About Controversy” in World Cultures eJournal and “Anthropology: Tribal Warfare” in Nature as well as numerous other publications.

     

  • The 3rd edition of Native Nations: The Survival of Indigenous Peoples comes at a pivotal time where Indigenous voices are rising up from around the world. It is important to develop a critical consciousness of the oppression of Indigenous people from a global perspective. This book locates these experiences from seventeen geographic areas through scholarly discourse. Although this collection features the struggles and successes of Indigenous peoples, it also reminds us that these traditional systems do not encompass a singular body of knowledge. They do, however, reflect the many levels of expression, being, and knowing that Western thinking does not presently address.

    Eric Bates, PhD

    Co-director, Native American Studies Program
    Northern Kentucky University

    The third edition of Native Nations is an outstanding thought-provoking compilation of case studies of indigenous peoples and their struggles for cultural survival. Neely and Hume include examples from around the world, including the Americas, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Taiwan, Pakistan, South Africa, and Western Europe. This work provides updated views of cultures long studied and held as examples in textbooks and classrooms such as the San, Maori, and Yanomami. Here, the authors and editors tackle complicated, yet vital, issues that Native Peoples face today including revitalization, rights, self-governing, health, and the future, all while situating these in the context of the processes associated with history and globalization that affect change in local populations and the lives of people. This work offers the means to move from listing examples of indigenous peoples and imagining their struggles to survive and preserve their cultures to actually presenting case studies that make these topics substance. It encourages critical thought and the application of concepts to real world issues to better understand our world and the peoples who inhabit it. In an age of diversity and inclusion, this work seriously addresses these notions by giving meaning to them in an edited work that is accessible to the public and certainly to students.

    Toni Copeland, PhD

    Senior Fellow
    Blount Scholars Program
    The University of Alabama